Social Network Sites and Blogging Posts – Are They Trustworthy?

What criteria do you use when considering if a blog post is credible or just a rambling creation of some author?  To examine this question I chose to review some posts using the website of the American Association for Respiratory Care, http://www.aarc.org/.  My interest in this website stems from my being a practicing Respiratory Therapist who also teaches the technology at a local community college.  I immediately found that there is another site AARConnect, http://connect.aarc.org/home/ that serves as the social and professional network for respiratory care.  The site uses facebook http://www.facebook.com/aarc.org,  Linkedin; Twitter – http://twitter.com/aarc_tweets; and most recently Pinterest where three boards have been created.  I used Twitter for a closer examination.

What criteria did I use when considering the posts to the Twitter account?  Obviously, it was easy to obtain the number of tweets, followers and following for each blogger.  Does that make one credible? Maybe or maybe not.  I also considered the bloggers credentials, education if available, professional memberships, awards if available and to a lesser extent writing style and blogging etiquette (see http://www.blogelina.com/2012/07/guest-post-how-to-pick-a-reliable-and-trustworthy-guest-poster-for-your-blog/)  All of these criteria, when used in combination, may lend credence to one’s credibility.

Interestingly, the bloggers are all individuals who have posted to the website.  Please consider:

Keith Lamb, RRT – member of many professional societies and organizations; received numerous awards; chairs a specialty section for the practice of respiratory care; participates in research and continues to practice.  I chose to become a follower of Mr. Lamb.

Michael Nibert, BSRC, RRT http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelnibert – member of many social networks and professional organization or societies; curently owner of a consulting firm; many years of management and clinical experience.  Although Mr. Nibert seemed to be a credible blogger, I chose not to follow him because it seemed to me that his blogs had more of a personal business component rather than purely professional.

Robert Fluck Jr., MS, RRT, FAARC – member of many professional organization or societies; connected many professional contacts; educator by profession.  Interestingly Mr. Fluck does not use social networks.  I did not chose to follow him.

Frank Salvatore – (Frank Salvatore @fse7rrt) – Mr Salvatore tweets on the AARC Twitter page.  Unfortunately, his tweets are of a personal, trivial nature and are not professionally oriented.  Obviously, I did not followhim.

James McAllister – (James McAllister @OldSald CityAce) – Mr Mcallisters tweets mainly are political in nature.  I chose to not follow Mr. McAllister.

So.. how credible or trustworthy are you?  Read this article and see!  http://blogs.hbr.org/baldoni/2008/05/how_trustworthy_are_you.html

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About macrtblog

Instructor - Delaware Tech
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2 Responses to Social Network Sites and Blogging Posts – Are They Trustworthy?

  1. I too look for the credentials of individual bloggers when I get that chance to read. But the overall question is how does one know if they are real, or just trying to impress. I think someone else had a chart attached to their blog showing how many people trusted the source of the blog based on familiarity with the blogger. High marks to those they knew verses complete strangers unless it was someone that had published an article or book. It’s amazing to me how much we are beginning to trust complete strangers and their opinions. All one needs to do is glance at the first page of comments left by all sorts of people on a CNN news item. Scary…

  2. I agree with the above comment when you state that it is funny how much we are starting to trust complete strangers. I too think it is scary. I also looked to see how much persoanl information was on their account. If there was a lot of personal information, I did not find them credible either.

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